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St Peter's
Catholic School

Media Studies

Miss C Taylor

Acting Head of Media Studies

THE TEAM
Mr P Bates Head of Computing
Ms C Meolir Teacher of Media Studies
INTRODUCTION TO THE DEPARTMENT

In the Media Studies Department, we aim to introduce students to new practical and creative skills in media production. We equip them with knowledge of the technical elements involved in producing their own media products, as well as an understanding of the theoretical concepts underpinning the production and reception of media texts.

WHY STUDY MEDIA STUDIES?

Media Studies is an interesting and rewarding course, covering both the theoretical aspects of media and the practical application of a full range of media texts. Media students are interested in how and why the media is so influential; we study how the media industry works and how it influences us on a daily basis. 

Through learning about a full range of media forms from newspapers to music videos and from film to radio, we explore how different groups are represented and how the media influences us.  Students get the chance to create their own media product based on what has most interested them.  This NEA might be key for students wishing to pursue a future career in media or communication including journalism, advertising or PR as they create a real-world product for a specified audience.

Media is such a fundamental part of our daily lives that we often take for granted the impact it has on us.  This course offers students an opportunity to step back from the world they inhabit and question who holds the real power and influence in the society in which they live.

FUTURE ACADEMIC AND CAREER PATHWAYS

Media Studies as a subject works well alongside Theatre Studies, IT, English, Sociology or Music. Many students choose to study a media-related subject at university, and some former students are currently employed in production and post-production companies. Careers using the Media Studies A Level include journalism, marketing and public relations and all careers in digital media including video gaming, citizen journalism and working with the big tech companies.

COURSE CONTENT

Students will be studying the OCR syllabus.

During the two years of the course, you will study various aspects of media, including:

  • Contemporary news in the UK (newspapers and online news websites)
  • Media language and representation in magazines, advertising and music videos
  • Media industries and audiences in radio, video games and film
  • Long-form television drama (both English and non-English dramas)

While the Media Theoretical Framework underpins all of the various principles and concepts studied, to provide students with the opportunity to develop their knowledge and understanding, there are plenty of practical activities and projects which allow students to improve their creative IT skills.

ASSESSMENT

Paper 1: Media Messages, written exam, 2 hours, 70 marks,

35% of A Level. You will be examined on your knowledge and understanding of topics 1 and 2 above.

Paper 2: Evolving Media, written exam, 2 hours, 70 marks, 35% of A Level. You will be examined on your knowledge and understanding of topics 3 and 4 above.

Non-examination Assessment: Approximately 30 hours, 60 marks, 30% of A Level. You will use your knowledge and skills to create a cross-media product in response to a brief set by the exam board. This will include a website and one of the following: a music video, a TV show opening sequence or a radio show opening sequence.

EXTRACURRICULAR OPPORTUNITIES

• Cinema screenings

• Oscar awards

• BFI study days

• BBC newsroom

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Grade 5 in GCSE English Language and English Literature is required. The most important skill is the ability to write accurately and coherently. It is also important to be able to confidently read around the subject of Media.